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Juba Kalamka

is most most recognized for his work with performance troupes Sins Invalid and Mangos with Chili, and as cofounder of the queer hip hop group Deep Dickollective (D/DC). Kalamka’s personal work centers on intersectional dialogues on race, identity, gender, disability, sexuality and class in popular media.

He received a 2005 Creating Change Award from the National LGBTQ Task Force for his activist work in queer music community and produced the annual East Bay Pride sponsored PeaceOUT World Homo Hop Festival from 2002-2007 which was featured in the 2005 documentary Pick Up The Mic. He regular appears in queer indy porn features since 2003 and toured the United States with the Sex Workers Art Show in 2006. In September 2015 he attended the White House Bisexual Community Public Policy Briefing with more than 40 activists from across the United States.

His essays and creative writing appear in numerous journals and anthologies including Working Sex: Sex Workers Write About A Changing Industry (2007), Vi är misfits! (2009), The Yale Anthology of Rap (2010), Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men and Queer and Trans Artists of Color: The Stories of Some of Our Lives (2014). His third solo album Nguzo Sabatage: A Jig School Confidential and first collection poetry, Son Of Byford, will be released in 2019.

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Julia Serano

is an Oakland-based writer, performer, biologist, and activist. She is the author of three books, Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity (now in second edition), Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive, and Outspoken: A Decade of Transgender Activism and Trans Feminism. Julia’s other writings have appeared in over a dozen anthologies, and in news and media outlets such as TIME, The Guardian, Salon, The Daily Beast, Alternet.org, Ms., Out, and The Advocate. Her writings have been used as teaching materials in college courses across North America. juliaserano.com

Sumiko Saulson

Sumiko Saulson is a science-fiction, fantasy and horror writer and graphic novelist. She was the 2016 recipient of the Horror Writer Association’s Scholarship from Hell. Her works include the reference guide 60 Black Women in Horror Fiction, novels include SolitudeThe Moon Cried BloodHappiness and Other DiseasesSomnaliaInsatiable and the Amazon bestselling horror comedy Warmth. She has written several short stories for several anthologies, including Forever VacancyBabes and BeastsTales from the Lake 3Clockwork Wonderland, and Carry the Light 5 where she won second place for the science-fiction short story “Agrippa.”  She writes for Search Magazine, and SumikoSaulson.com.  The child of African American and Russian-Jewish American parents, she is a native Californian who grew up in Los Angeles and Hawaii. She is an Oakland resident who has spent most of her adult life in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Jan Steckel

was a Harvard- and Yale-trained pediatrician who took care of Spanish-speaking children until chronic pain persuaded her to change professions to writer, poet and medical editor. She is an activist for bisexual and disability rights who lives in Oakland, California.

Her poetry book The Horizontal Poet (Zeitgeist Press, 2011) won a 2012 Lambda Literary Award. Her fiction chapbookMixing Tracks (Gertrude Press, 2009) and poetry chapbook The Underwater Hospital (Zeitgeist Press, 2006) also won awards. Her creative writing has appeared in Scholastic Magazine, Yale Medicine, Bellevue Literary Review, and elsewhere. Her work won the Goodreads Newsletter Poetry Contest, a Zeiser Grant for Women Artists, the Jewel by the Bay Poetry Competition, Triplopia’s Best of the Best competition, and three Pushcart nominations. 

Josephine Gash

is an artist and writer living in the Bay Area. She believes in stories: their ability to create empathy, help people see what's present and alive, and imagine new possibilities. In this workshop, we'll look at examples of bi characters in YA fiction, examine the narrative choices that authors use to represent bi characters, and spend time writing personal or imagined narratives that feel true to us.